3 Common Mistakes that Can Void Your Auto Warranty

Susan Parker By Susan Parker, 13th Nov 2016 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/xn683q1z/
Posted in Wikinut>Money>Travel & Transport

A warranty is the manufacturer's way of assuring you that nothing should ordinarily go wrong with your car before the end of the coverage period. However, there are some mistakes you might make unknowingly that can void your car's warranty.

A warranty is a sign of confidence and good faith

Every new car comes with a manufacturer's warranty—an official promise by the manufacturer to bear the cost of fixing anything that breaks in your car within a specified period of time. This coverage period varies by manufacturer and car model, but is usually 3 years or 36,000 miles (whichever comes first).

A warranty is a sign of confidence and good faith, and the manufacturer's way of assuring you that nothing should ordinarily go wrong with your car before the end of the coverage period. And if anything goes wrong within the period, it's most likely due to a manufacturing flaw. So, you won't have to pay for that.

However, there are some mistakes you might make unknowingly that can void your car's warranty before the end of its coverage period. And unfortunately, once you void your warranty, you cannot revalidate it.

Here are three common car warranty mistakes you must avoid.

1. Skipping routine maintenance

Not doing routine maintenance on your car will easily void your warranty, according to consultant at Seattle Trucking Accident Lawyers. Of course, if your car engine burns to a crisp because you've not changed the oil in ages, it would be obvious that your negligence caused it. And no manufacturer will bear the cost of repairs in that instance. So, always stick with the manufacturer's instructions regarding routine maintenance.

If you cannot find your vehicle's owner's manual, visit the manufacturer's official website to see if you can download another one. Better yet, ask your mechanic how frequently you should bring your car for maintenance.

2. Not keeping receipts of repairs

Although your best bet is to have your car serviced or repaired by the dealer, there's no problem using a quick lube or local repair facility—provided you'll abide by two rules. Firstly, the service provider must use only specified fluids, OEM quality filters, and other replacement parts recommended by the manufacturer. And secondly, you must keep all receipts and records.

Dealers automatically keep records of repairs and servicing done, and send the records electronically to the proper quarters for processing. But hiring other service providers doesn't come with the same advantage. You need to meticulously keep records yourself. Without these, your warranty claim won't be accepted.

3. Modifying your car's performance or usage

Another common mistake you must avoid is making performance modifications to your car or using it for purposes it's not meant for. A common example of performance modification is installing a power chip to boost your car engine output. This practice increases an engine's power by boosting its drivability and other parameters of engine management. Unfortunately, it usually results in a blown head gasket. If this happens, the manufacturer will deny your warranty claim.

Similarly, if you use your car to tow a trailer when it's not designed for that, you'll void your warranty. Towing vehicles usually have increase cooling system capacity, increased suspension to handle additional weight, and other enhanced features that help them withstand the task of towing. If your car doesn't have these enhancements, using it for towing will cause overheating of the engine and transmission as well as damage to the suspension, frame, and other parts. No manufacturer will cover such faults.

Tags

Automobiles, Automotive, Warranty

Meet the author

author avatar Susan Parker
I am a writer, business consultant and graphic designer. I write about the relationships between business, life and personal development.

Share this page

moderator Peter B. Giblett moderated this page.
If you have any complaints about this content, please let us know

Comments

Add a comment
Username
Can't login?
Password