Save Gas - Relocate

Clair Schwan By Clair Schwan, 29th Jul 2010 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/15k86xtr/
Posted in Wikinut>Money>Travel & Transport

One way to save gas is to relocate closer to where you work. It's a big investment, but it can pay for itself in terms of time, money, and health. It's worth considering if you're already considering relocation. The key is to make the move pay bigger dividends by reducing your commute and the money your spend on the fuel.

The Problem

If you live a long ways from work, you're spending quite a bit of time traveling, and it's likely that you're also spending quite a bit of money in fuel. I know individuals who drive 2 hours to get to work. That has to be a big drain on a person from a health perspective as well.

It's understandable that perhaps a long commute to work is tolerable if you have a great job or you know that your days are numbered at your place of employment. However, what if your long view suggests that you're going to be spending hours each day traveling back and forth to work, and you're going to be doing this for years? It might not be all that tolerable.

A Possible Solution

It may seem quite radical in nature, but much of the problem associated with commuting to work can be solved by simply changing where you live. Of course, this isn't a simple task, nor is it something that one would take lightly, but it is a viable option, especially if you were planning to move anyway.

Just think of the joy of a shorter commute or a "counter-commute" instead of a long and frustrating drive with hundreds of others on the road. It would likely require many years of fuel savings to make relocation cost-effective, so it would be nice to identify other benefits as well.

Perhaps a different residence might afford you the opportunity to take advantage of public transportation where someone else does the "driving" instead of you. Even if you still have to drive to work, a reduction in fuel costs also comes with time savings, and less "wear and tear" on the body and soul. Although these factors aren't a direct savings in terms of money, they certainly have to be considered.

Decision Making

Like making any decision, there's a "push" and a "pull" to consider. Here are some things to think about when making such a decision. On the side pushing you out of your current home and into a new one, we need to consider:

- Are you thinking about moving anyway?
- Is your commute extremely long or arduous?
- Are fuel costs becoming a large consumer of what you earn?
- Might there be a spot in town that offers many desirable attributes such as closer to work, a better environment, and a nicer home?
- Your place of work is highly desirable and you think there is a long-term future with them.
- You're renting and you don't have much to take with you to the next apartment.

On the side that's pulling you back into the residence you currently have, we might well consider:

- The possibility of your office relocating and fouling up your plans.
- You're planning to look for another job anyway.
- Overall cost of relocation is prohibitive.

When these and many other factors are considered, it may very well be that relocating to reduce the money and time spent commuting just doesn't justify a move. Nevertheless, if you're planning to move your residence, it would be wise to consider the effect that location has with respect to the cost of fuel, and other costs associated with getting to and from your place of employment.

Tags

Commuting, Frugal Living, Frugality, Save Gas, Save Money, Transportation

Meet the author

author avatar Clair Schwan
A former management and technical consultant who lives a self reliant lifestyle on the high plains of southeastern Wyoming. An avid vegetable gardener who is fond of raising small animals for meat and eggs, engaging in do-it-yourself projects, and wr...(more)

Share this page

moderator johnnydod moderated this page.
If you have any complaints about this content, please let us know

Comments

author avatar JD
29th Jul 2010 (#)

Good article. A simple solution that most people don't think of.

Reply to this comment

Add a comment
Username
Can't login?
Password